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Technology and the Skin

Recent scientific evidence suggests that High Energy Visible (HEV) light at the wavelengths that the eye perceives as blue to violet is harmful to skin. HEV light has been shown to generate the same amount of reactive oxygen species (ROSs) in the skin as those produced by UVA and UVB combined. The exact impact of this ROS burst to normal biochemical cycles that maintain healthy skin is not fully understood.

Lipo Chemicals has conducted a study analyzing the changes in the skin’s gene expression when exposed to HEV light. This study’s results indicate that HEV light may significantly affect the skin’s inflammatory cascade and its progression to healing, barrier recovery, cell cycles and melanogenesis. The results may explain the variety of previously described effects of HEV light on skin and shed new light on the understanding of what is believed to be the harmful impact that leads to accelerated skin aging. In order to maintain skin’s health the skin must be shielded from this wavelength.

What is High Energy Visible Light?

High energy visible (HEV) light is a high frequency light in the blue/violet region with wavelengths from 400 to 500 nm created from Laptops, Cell Phones, LED lights etc. While the public is highly educated regarding the dangers associated with excessive exposure to ultraviolet light in the UVA and UVB wavelengths, findings in recent years indicate that we have yet to explore the full spectrum of adverse effects related to sun exposure.

What Damage Can Be Caused By HEV Light?

Like UVA, HEV light may be another silent, long-term aging wavelength. It does not generate the immediate erythema or edema reactions triggered by UVB, but it may induce carcinogenesis and accelerated photoaging. While the effect of UVB radiation is associated with direct damage to the DNA, the cellular damage caused by HEV radiation is less direct and is associated with the generation of free radicals and the induction of oxidative stress. HEV is most likely absorbed by endogenous non-DNA chromophores in the skin, a process that leads to the generation of photo-sensitization mediators. In their photo-excited state these intermediates exert damage by directly reacting with substrate molecules, including DNA bases or molecular oxygen leading to ROS formation.

What can I do to protect my skin?

Skin by Marywynn’s new Total Age Corrector and Eye Serum both contain Liposhield which is currently the only ingredient on the market proven to protect against HEV light. This fractioned melanin compound from vegetable origin was designed to be applied topically as an environmental defense. It is designed to shield the skin from HEV light and scavenge free-radicals generated by the sources of HEV light. Layer with Skin by Marywynn’s Antioxidant Defense complex for extra free-radical protection.

 

References: YG Labs and GCI Magazine and Lipo Chemicals

There’s No Such Thing as a Healthy Tan

We hear a lot of people talking about getting a “base tan” before vacation or for a Vitamin D boost. What they don’t realize is that the harmful effects of this far outweigh the benefits. We tell our clients to wear SPF everyday (yes, even if it’s raining) we are always exposed to damaging rays. We have a sunscreen for every skin type. Stop in and we will help you find a sunscreen that best fits your skin type and lifestyle. Below is the process of the skin getting a tan. We are hoping a better understanding of the process will be a motivating factor to applying your sun protection everyday.

A tan is a a sign of injury. Tanned skin will forever contain cells whose genetic structures have been permanently damaged by the sun. There is no such thing as a healthy tan.

The sun gives off invisible rays of ultraviolet light. Ultraviolet B (UVB) rays are short, high-energy wavelengths that are absorbed by the epidermis, the outermost layer of the skin. When you burn, the skin responds to UVB rays by producing chemicals called inflammatory mediators, some of which seep down into the dermis, the skin’s middle layer. These chemicals irritate the tiny blood vessels in the dermis, which swell and create the surface redness of the burn.

At the same time, the UVB rays affect the genetic material of the epidermis, which causes the damage that may lead to skin cancer. Other UVB rays can affect the immune system and interfere with the skin’s ability to repair itself. Finally, UVB radiation attacks the skin’s melanocytes (pigment cells). The melanocytes react by stepping up production of melanin and sending melanasomes to the skin’s surface to act as a filter against the sun’s rays which are actually damaging the DNA of the pigment cells. This kind of genetic damage causes both freckling and the mottled brown of age spots. More seriously, it contributes to the development of melanoma and other skin cancers.

Ultraviolet A (UVA) rays – longer than UVB rays – can also do lasting damage. They penetrate the skin more deeply than UVB rays, affecting the DNA of the cells in the dermis, attacking cell membranes, and changing the proteins that make up collagen and elastin, which support the skin’s fibrous structure. By undermining these parts of the skin, UVA rays lead directly to wrinkles and sagging of the skin. They also contribute to the loss of support for the skin’s tiny blood vessels, which become permanently dilated. This shows up as a general ruddiness or visible spider veins on the nose, cheeks and chin. UVA rays also play a role in the development of skin cancer.

-American Skin Association

 

 

Humidity and the Skin

 

 

Our skin acts as a two-way barrier, protecting external elements from coming in and allowing the passage of excess water to move outward.  Having the right level of moisture and pH is key. Although having some humidity in the air is good for the skin, with the high humidity we have been having you may want to switch to a lighter moisturizer. We suggest Skin by Marywynn Oil-Free Hydrating Fluid, Circadia Aquaporin or Valmont Soothing Cream. Also, layering Tizo 3 Sunscreen over the top can give a more even complexion while giving you the sun protection you need.

 

Filed under: acne,education,service,skincare,sunscreen,Valmont — alliehermens

UVA (ages) UVB (burns)

It’s officially fall today, 46 when I got up this morning and sunny and crisp right now. I had a new client this morning and when I asked if she is wearing sunscreen everyday said I only wear it when it is sunny!

I want to clarify a few misconceptions regarding UVA.

  • It is approximately the same strength year round
  • Is full strength year round
  • Penetrates glass
  • Is in fluorescent light bulbs
  • Strong at any altitude
  • Damages deeper in the skin than UVB

If you can change your mindset about sunscreen and think of it as anti-aging perhaps you won’t hesitate to use it daily!

Filed under: anti-aging,education,sunscreen — Tags: , — MaryWynn

Gold Star for new Client

I have a lovely client, K who retired to Portland a few years back having spent years in the Texan Sun. Last month in order to take advantage of our bring a friend special (did I mention she is also very smart) she brought her husband B in for his first facial. B and I were having a great time during his facial when it came time for extractions and a really good look at his skin after exfoliating. There, under the mag lamp, on the side of his nose was a spot that looked very different than all of the others. I asked him about it, he said I go every six months, payback for all the damage I did as a kid. But since he had just been for his check up, he wondered if it was necessary to go right away. I’m not a doctor, but have seen plenty of per-cancerous spots that I said yes, please go soon. Better safe than sorry.

Well he listened, went and turns out it was pre-cancerous. His doctor stated it was a very fast growing type so he was glad he came in early for his check up. Now I have said to countless clients, some on their first visit please get this spot checked. Often times I never see or hear from them again, but this time I did. K & B just came back for another round of facials and K thanked me for suggesting he get checked. I just wanted to pin a gold star on his chest for following up! To all of you that we say, hey has this spot been here for a while or has it changed lately we are not trying to scare you. Just trying to encourage you to head to the dermatologist for a spot check. Like I said to B, better safe than sorry.

Filed under: life,sunscreen — MaryW

Frequently Used Excuses for not Wearing Sunscreen

Ok here I go again, wear sunscreen everyday,rain or shin. That’s really all I should have to say, but many of us need to be reminded of the many reasons we need to protect ourselves from damaging UV rays.

Perhaps we should go about this a bit differently this time. I am going to address the most frequently used reasons our clients come up with for not using SPF.

1. I need my vitamin D and SPF will cause a deficiency!

Umm no it won’t, you only need about 20 minutes of noontime exposure on your head, neck or back of your hands to make about 1000 IU’s of Vitamin D. Or take a supplement, from what I’ve read the human body doesn’t know the difference between the two. So go take a walk…on your lunch break, your waistline will thank me.

2. You only need to wear SPF on sunny days!

Again, umm no you don’t. You need to protect yourself against both UVA and UVB. The majority of us protect against UVB, the burning rays we can feel. Listen to this, UVA damages the skin at much deeper level than UVB. UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. It is present while it’s day time…raining or cloudy year round.

3. I don’t like to use it, it makes my skin look white and oily.

We have several options that are oil free and absorb easily into the skin, leaving the skin feeling soft and hydrated. If you don’t like ours find another, they are out there.

4. I look better with a little color!

You call it color and I tell you it’s your DNA screaming at you to get the heck out of the sun. Really when your skin turns color it’s your body’s imperfect way of trying to protect itself. The only safe tan is a fake tan, or you could wear some bronzer. Another option is to learn to love your inner pale chick or dude, I do.

5. I use tanning beds, they don’t have UV.

Umm, yes they do. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, “tanning beds emit does of UV as much as 12 times higher than the sun. People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent.”

 

6. I am naturally tan.

All skin, regardless of color needs SPF.

 

We want you around to enjoy facials and everything else that life has to offer, so play it safe. Wear a big hat, sunglasses and sunscreen, your DNA will thank you.

Filed under: sunscreen — MaryWynn

Watch this video on Melanoma, please.

This is an amazing video a friend sent me in response to my last newsletter.

 http://www.thatvideosite.com/video/dear_16yearold_me 

I will say it again, wear sunscreen everyday, rain or shine. If you are outdoors, wear hats, sunglasses and reapply.

Filed under: education,sunscreen — MaryWynn

You Scream, I Scream, We All Scream For Sunscreen!

Seriously, as my friend Shannon at Urban Waxx would say. It’s summer and you need to wear it. It’s that simple.

Filed under: microdermabrasion,sunscreen — MaryWynn

May is Melanoma Awarness Month

Here I go again, wear your sunscreen everyday rain or shine. That’s really all I should have to say, but many of us need to be reminded of the many reasons we need to protect ourselves from damaging UV rays. 

Perhaps we should go about this a bit differently this time. I am going to address the most frequently used reasons our clients come up with for not using SPF.

1. I need my vitamin D and SPF will cause a deficiency!

Umm no it won’t, you only need about 20 minutes of noontime exposure on your head, neck or back of your hands to make about 1000 IU’s of Vitamin D. Or take a supplement, the human body doesn’t know the difference between the two. So go take a walk…on your lunch break, your waistline will thank me.

2. You only need to wear SPF on sunny days!

Again, umm no you don’t. You need to protect yourself against both UVA and UVB. The majority of us protect against UVB, the burning rays we can feel. Listen to this,  UVA damages the skin at much deeper level than UVB. UVA damages skin cells called keratinocytes in the basal layer of the epidermis, where most skin cancers occur. It is present while it’s day time…raining or cloudy year round.

3. I don’t like to use it, it makes my skin look white and oily.

We have several options that are oil free and absorb easily into the skin, leaving the skin feeling soft and hydrated. If you don’t like ours find another, they are out there.

4. I look better with a little color!

You call it color and I tell you it’s your DNA screaming at you to get the heck out of the sun. Really when your skin turns color it’s your body’s imperfect way of trying to protect itself. The only safe tan is a fake tan. Another option is to learn to love your inner pale chick or dude, I do.

5. I use tanning beds, they don’t have UV.

Umm, yes they do. According to the Skin Cancer Foundation, “tanning beds emit does of UV as much as 12 times higher than the sun. People who use tanning beds are 2.5 times more likely to develop squamous cell carcinoma, and 1.5 times more likely to develop basal cell carcinoma. According to recent research, first exposure to tanning beds in youth increases melanoma risk by 75 percent.”

6. I am naturally tan.

All skin, regardless of color needs SPF protection…see above.

We want you around to enjoy facials and everything else that life has to offer, so play it safe. Wear a big hat, sunglasses and sunscreen, your DNA will thank you.

Filed under: sunscreen — MaryWynn

9 Essential Suncare Tips

You say sunscreen, I say protection. Whatever you call it, it’s the most important step in skincare. From preventing premature aging to helping fight skin cancer, sunscreen is necessary. But! Experts say most of us don’t use it correctly. Why? Because sunscreen is dose specific. Even though makeup contains some, it doesn’t usually contain enough. Here are nine essential steps towards effective skin protection:

  1. Wear SPF 30. Under your makeup you need at least SPF 30. Our 2 faves? Tu-el’s Essential Protection Oil Free Moisturizer with SPF 30 and Tizo 3 SPF 40.
  2. Get “broad spectrum” protection. Your sunscreen needs protection from both UVA and UVB. UVA “ages” the skin damaging deeper in the skin and UVB burns. UVA is there is it is daytime, if you are indoors and while it’s raining. It’s in your fluorescent light bulbs, even. And 80% of UV rays still get through the clouds.
  3. Apply sunscreen liberally. When applying, don’t forget the back of your neck, tops of your ears, décolleté, and any other skin that will be exposed, like the back of your hands.
  4. Teach kids to love sunscreen. It’s a healthy habit that can last a lifetime. A large portion of lifetime sun exposure happens before the age of 18.
  5. Be time sensitive. If you can, avoid the sun between 11 am and 3 pm. That’s when the rays are the most intense.
  6. Apply and reapply. Spending the day outdoors? Bring extra sunscreen to reapply every few hours.
  7. Take care with SPF. If you find that you’re still getting burned or tan, try a higher SPF or apply more frequently.
  8. No clouds, still sun! Even in Portland where the skies are often gray, you still need to wear sunscreen — every day.
  9. It’s Anti-Aging! Think of Sunscreen as Anti-aging not anti-burning. If your immune cells aren’t under attack from UV they can do the job of healing and repairing your skin from past damage, making you look younger!

Happy sun protection!

Filed under: sunscreen — bclone